New insights on postharvest ecophysiology of fresh horticultural crops

We focus on the role of abiotic factors on processes related to structural modifications of the flesh due to depolymerization of principal components of cell walls and loss of cell turgor, which affect texture

Endrit Kullaj

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • There is an increased awareness of the role of preharvest abiotic stresses on the quality of horticultural products and their retention, there is a need for more pertinent research and technological advances, especially under climatic change scenarios. Another impetus for such a focus on research should be that consumers are looking for the nutraceutical values of fruits and vegetables, that is, their constituents such as carotenoids, flavonoids and other polyphenols, phenolic acids, and other phytonutrients, which are even more susceptible to variations in temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc
  • An attempt was made to exemplify the main horticultural crop species; frequent reference to some of these is related to the level of scientific reports, which relates to their storability, short lifecycle, and economic importance
  • We focus on the role of abiotic factors on processes related to structural modifications of the flesh due to depolymerization of principal components of cell walls and loss of cell turgor, which affect texture
  • Other important processes discussed at some detail involve modifications of nutritional and organoleptic value of fruits due to an increase in mono- and disaccharides following starch hydrolysis and/or de novo synthesis, biosynthesis of volatile compositions, and the degradation of organic acids
  • This structure enables us to concentrate on the biological processes elucidated by the most recent scientific knowledge

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