Alcohol use and abuse in the frail, homebound elderly: a clinical analysis of 103 persons

We studied alcohol use and abuse in 103 frail, homebound elderly individuals cared for in a long-term home health care program from July 1991 to February 1992

Stephen J. Bercsi; Philip W. Brickner; Dhanonjoy C. Saha

2004

Scholarcy highlights

  • We studied alcohol use and abuse in 103 frail, homebound elderly individuals cared for in a long-term home health care program from July 1991 to February 1992
  • Eighty-four percent were abstinent at the time of the study, including 25 past heavy drinkers
  • Previous alcohol use or abuse was associated with a history of smoking, cardiovascular morbidity, social isolation, and anxiety or agitation
  • Current social drinking was associated with sedative-hypnotic use as well as smoking
  • Twenty-three of 25 past heavy drinkers remained sober on our programs without the use of formal alcohol treatment
  • Abstinence is known to increase with age, appears to be fostered by the homebound setting, is feasible for homebound elderly persons and is often accepted

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