Methods for preservation and extension of shelf life

There is potential for spoilage of all foods at some rate or other following harvest, slaughter or manufacture and spoilage may occur at any of the stages between the acquisition of raw materials and the eventual consumption of a food product. These stages include processing, packaging, distribution, retail display, transport, storage and use by the consumer. They are under varying degrees of control that aim to deliver a satisfactory shelf life, to ensure that the -consumed product is of high quality and to ensure that it is safe

Grahame W. Gould

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • There is potential for spoilage of all foods at some rate or other following harvest, slaughter or manufacture and spoilage may occur at any of the stages between the acquisition of raw materials and the eventual consumption of a food product. These stages include processing, packaging, distribution, retail display, transport, storage and use by the consumer. They are under varying degrees of control that aim to deliver a satisfactory shelf life, to ensure that the -consumed product is of high quality and to ensure that it is safe
  • The various forms of microbiological spoilage are preventable to a large degree by a wide range of preservation techniques, most of which act by preventing or inhibiting microbial growth
  • A smaller number of techniques act by inactivating microorganisms
  • Additional techniques restrict the access of microorganisms to products
  • Many of the existing and emerging preservation techniques act by interfering with the homeostatic mechanisms that microorganisms have evolved in order to survive extreme environmental stresses

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