Changes of NGF level in mouse hypothalamus following intermale aggressive behaviour: Biological and immunohistochemical evidence

Our results showed that intermale aggressive behaviour induced by 6–8 weeks of social isolation induces an Nerve growth factor increase in the hypothalamic area, which is not abolished by sialoadenectomy, suggesting that the increased brain NGF is locally synthesized, and does not come from salivary sources

Luigi Aloe; Enrico Alleva; Roberta De Simone

2003

Scholarcy highlights

  • Nerve growth factor immunoreactivity was detected in the hypothalamus of adult male mice
  • Tissue culture bioassays showed that hypothalamic extract elicits neurite outgrowth from both chick sensory ganglia and rat superior cervical ganglia neurons, and that these effects are inhibited by addition of NGF antibodies
  • Our results showed that intermale aggressive behaviour induced by 6–8 weeks of social isolation induces an NGF increase in the hypothalamic area, which is not abolished by sialoadenectomy, suggesting that the increased brain NGF is locally synthesized, and does not come from salivary sources
  • The present results and a recent report showing that aggressive behaviour causes an increase of mRNANGF in hypothalamic areas are discussed in relation to a possible functional role of NGF in these brain structures
  • Most researchers agree that both NGF and its receptor tyrosine kinase receptor A are continuously expressed throughout aging and at least the NGF level is unaltered in the hippocampus
  • This study aimed to explore the influence of two different stressors, acute and chronic exposure to forced swim stress or high-light open-field stress, on cells containing NGF and TrkA
  • Aim of this review is to discuss the evidence suggesting a role for neurotrophins as multifunctional signaling molecules activated during allostatic responses to stressful events and their involvement in the complex pathophysiology underlying stress-related psychopathology

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