The thermoregulatory advantages of hominid bipedalism in open equatorial environments: the contribution of increased convective heat loss and cutaneous evaporative cooling

The thermoregulatory advantages of hominid bipedalism in open equatorial environments: the contribution of increased convective heat loss and cutaneous evaporative cooling

P.E. Wheeler

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • The thermoregulatory advantages of hominid bipedalism in open equatorial environments: the contribution of increased convective heat loss and cutaneous evaporative cooling
  • The thermoregulatory advantages conferred by bipedalism to a large-brained primate on the African savannah could have been significant factors contributing to the adoption of this unusual mode of terrestrial locomotion
  • The major benefit is a dramatic reduction in direct solar radiation exposure, additional advantages result from the higher distribution of the body surfaces
  • Windspeeds are higher and air temperatures lower away from the ground, both factors increasing the rate at which a biped dissipates heat by convection
  • The greater airflow and low relative humidity above any surface vegetation present will increase the rate at which sweat can be evaporated from the skin

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