Reduced sleep duration affects body composition, dietary intake and quality of life in obese subjects

In the present study, using an actigraphic measure for sleep duration and measuring body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, we found that in subjects sleeping equal or less than 5 h absolute and relative fat mass, and truncal fat mass were significantly increased, despite body mass index was not significantly different between the two study groups

Eleonora Poggiogalle; Carla Lubrano; Lucio Gnessi; Chiara Marocco; Luca Di Lazzaro; Giampaolo Polidoro; Federica Luisi; Gianluca Merola; Stefania Mariani; Silvia Migliaccio; Andrea Lenzi; Lorenzo M. Donini

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • In the last years, accumulating evidence focused on sleep and its association with health status
  • The aim of our study was to explore the relationship among sleep duration, body composition, dietary intake, and quality of life in obese subjects
  • Even though mounting evidence has shown the association linking sleep duration and obesity, in the majority of the extant studies the body mass index and/or waist circumference were used as indicators of adiposity
  • In the present study, using an actigraphic measure for sleep duration and measuring body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, we found that in subjects sleeping equal or less than 5 h absolute and relative fat mass, and truncal fat mass were significantly increased, despite BMI was not significantly different between the two study groups
  • Our results regarding total and visceral adiposity are in agreement with findings from the Quebec Family Study, in which middle-aged, overweight and obese subjects with a self-reported sleep duration ranging from 5 to 6 h exhibited a greater BMI, body fat percentage, and a higher sum of the trunk skinfolds than their counterparts with a 7to 8-h sleep time
  • In a young population of overweight individuals, BMI or body fat percentage were significantly augmented in case of an objectively measured sleep duration lower than 6 h
  • In obese subjects a decreased sleep duration negatively influenced the health-related quality of life independently of total adiposity and body mass

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