A multi-scale assessment of human vulnerability to climate change in the Aral Sea basin

This review examines the role of scale in the assessment human vulnerability to climate change and offers a multi-scale approach to vulnerability assessment

Elena Lioubimtseva

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • Vulnerability to climate change impacts is defined by three dimensions of human–environmental systems, such as exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity
  • The existing protocols of vulnerability assessment fail to incorporate the multitude of scales associated with climate change processes
  • Changing trends in the Aral Sea basin are driven by multiple interconnected factors, such as changes in the global atmospheric circulation associated with the GHG-enhanced warming, regional hydrological and hydrometeorological changes caused by mountain-glacial melting and massive irrigation, land-use and land-cover changes, as well as hydrological, biogeochemical, and meso- and microclimatic changes in the remains of the Aral Sea and its exposed dry bottom
  • This review examines the role of scale in the assessment human vulnerability to climate change and offers a multi-scale approach to vulnerability assessment
  • In addition to the global climate change impacts, it takes into account regional and local land-use and land-cover changes, social, cultural, political, and institutional factors

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