Neurocognitive Functioning in Depressed Young People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

The findings suggest that currently depressed young people display a range of neurocognitive weaknesses which may impact treatment engagement and outcome

Joanne Goodall; Caroline Fisher; Sarah Hetrick; Lisa Phillips; Emma M. Parrish; Kelly Allott

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Depression is among the most common mental health problems for young people
  • Depression is associated with neurocognitive deficits that reduce the effectiveness of treatment and impair educational and vocational functioning
  • Less is known about the neurocognitive functioning of young people with depression, and existing research has reported inconsistent findings
  • This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized the literature on neurocognitive functioning in currently depressed youth aged 12–25 years in comparison to healthy controls
  • Poorer performance in the domains of attention, verbal memory were identified in depressed youth
  • The findings suggest that currently depressed young people display a range of neurocognitive weaknesses which may impact treatment engagement and outcome
  • Stressful life events and previous episodes in the etiology of major depression in women: An evaluation of the “kindling” hypothesis

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