In Search of Culturally Appropriate Autism Interventions: Perspectives of Latino Caregivers

This study presents several findings that are empirically and clinically significant for Latino families receiving intervention for autism spectrum disorder

Michaela DuBay; Linda R. Watson; Wanqing Zhang

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • Most evidence-based autism spectrum disorder interventions are tested with primarily White, mid-upper class, English-speaking populations, despite the increase in Latino children with ASD in early intervention programs throughout the United States
  • The Latino Spanish-speaking sample appropriately represents the target cultural group for this study, including Latino ethnicity, Spanish-speaking, and any other cultural characteristics common among more enculturated families living in the US, including factors related to socio-economic status
  • In this study of non-Latino White and LSS caregivers of young children with ASD, we sought to understand differences in perceptions of early interventions between groups as well as to identify various factors involved in Latino caregivers' perceptions of therapy strategies, service providers, intervention targets, and models of intervention
  • This study presents several findings that are empirically and clinically significant for Latino families receiving intervention for ASD
  • The only significant difference in subscales showed that NLW families perceived early intervention as less helpful than LSS parents in teaching parents how to help their children develop and learn, though a similar trend was observed in teaching parents how to communicate their child's needs
  • This difference may not represent a lack of need in Latino families, but rather need in both groups, with greater perceived need in the NLW caregivers
  • Empirical studies of these interventions could determine if providers can help Latino caregivers to become more effective in familiar strategies or learn new strategies that benefit their children

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