Effect of repeated immobilization on serotonin metabolism in different rat brain areas and on serum corticosterone

Male Lewis rats were immobilized for a 10 min period daily once or on 5 consecutive days

H.-W. Clement

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • Male Lewis rats were immobilized for a 10 min period daily once or on 5 consecutive days
  • Recordings were performed in brain areas involved in the control of behaviour, mood, and stress response such as the frontal cortex, the hippocampal CA-3 and dentate gyrus, the striatum, and the raphe nuclei dorsalis and medialis
  • The first immobilization resulted in an increase of the extracellular 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in all areas under study, except the striatum where no reaction was observed
  • The major effect was recorded in the frontal cortex, showing an increase of about 400% as compared to control, which lasted for 3 h after the end of the immobilization period
  • Beginning on day 2 in all areas, except the striatum, a consecutive habituation to the stressor seemed to occur, since the stress-induced increase in the voltammetric signal was found to be reduced after consecutive immobilization
  • Our data indicate that the serotonin metabolism shows habituation in most brain areas after repeated immobilization, though the corticosterone level at the end of the immobilization period was comparable after single and repeated immobilization

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