Stereospecificity in strigolactone biosynthesis and perception

Strigolactones typically comprise a tricyclic ABC ring system linked through an enol-ether bridge to a butenolide D-ring

Gavin R. Flematti

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Strigolactones typically comprise a tricyclic ABC ring system linked through an enol-ether bridge to a butenolide D-ring
  • Plants produce strigolactones with different structures and different stereospecificities which provides the potential for diversity and flexibility of function
  • The stereochemistry of the butenolide ring is conserved but two alternative configurations of the B–C ring junction leads to two families of SLs, exemplified by strigol and orobanchol
  • Further modifications lead to production of many different strigolactones within each family
  • Strigol- and orobanchol-type SLs have different activities in the control of seed germination and shoot branching, depending on plant species. This can partly be explained by different stereospecificity of SL receptors which includes the KAI2/HTL protein family in parasitic plants and the D14 protein functioning in shoot development
  • Many studies use chemically synthesised SL analogues such as GR24 which is prepared as a racemic mixture of two stereoisomers, one with the same stereo-configuration as strigol, and the other its enantiomer, which does not correspond to any known SL
  • Caution should be exercised in the use of SL racemic mixtures, while the use of specific stereoisomers can provide powerful tools and yield critical information about receptors and signalling pathways in operation

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