Naproxen in the environment: its occurrence, toxicity to nontarget organisms and biodegradation

Naproxen, which is a bicyclic propionic acid derivative, is a widely known drug from the group of non-selective, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Danuta WojcieszyƄska; Urszula Guzik

2020

Scholarcy highlights

  • Naproxen, which is a bicyclic propionic acid derivative, is a widely known drug from the group of non-selective, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • The advantages of naproxen are its rapid absorption and its long duration of action, which result from its long biological half-life, and its ability to strongly bind to the plasma proteins
  • Its toxicity is probably connected with a loss of the chemical moieties of naproxen resulting in a lower steric effect and easier penetration into the cells of Vibrio fischeri
  • Low concentrations of naproxen occur in the environment, the increase in its toxicity may be related to a synergy effect with other contaminations
  • The best described is the naproxen degradation pathway in Bacillus thuringiensis B1(2015b), which occurs via demethylation to O-desmethylnaproxen
  • Toxicological studies indicate that long-term exposure to environmental doses may negatively affect the organisms that live in a habitat, especially if naproxen co-occurs with other drugs
  • Another problem is the appearance of hydroxylated derivatives of naproxen as a result of transformation, which may have a more negative impact on living organisms, due to their greater hydrophilicity

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