Use of laser scanning confocal microscopy for characterizing changes in film thickness and local surface morphology of UV-exposed polymer coatings

Laser scanning confocal microscopy has been used to characterize the changes in film thickness and local surface morphology of polymer coatings during the UV degradation process

Li-Piin Sung; Joan Jasmin; Xiaohong Gu; Tinh Nguyen; Jonathan W. Martin

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Laser scanning confocal microscopy has been used to characterize the changes in film thickness and local surface morphology of polymer coatings during the UV degradation process
  • Two acrylic polymer coatings were chosen for the study, and the physical and chemical changes of the two systems at various exposure times were measured and analyzed
  • Those measurable physical changes caused by UV exposure include film ablation, formation of pits and other surface defects, and increases in surface roughness
  • It was found in both coatings that changes in measured film thickness by LSCM were not correlated linearly to the predicted thickness loss using the changes in the CH band obtained by the Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy measurements in the later degradation stages
  • At later stages, where surface deformation became severe, surface roughness and profile information using Laser scanning confocal microscopy were proven to be useful for analyzing the surface degradation process

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