Procrastination and Depression from a Cognitive Perspective: An Exploration of the Associations Among Procrastinatory Automatic Thoughts, Rumination, and Mindfulness

The current study examined the associations among procrastination, ruminative brooding, mindfulness, and self-compassion

Alison L. Flett; Mohsen Haghbin; Timothy A. Pychyl

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Extensive research indicates that procrastination is associated with many maladaptive outcomes including diminished performance and greater psychological distress, but the specific factors and mechanisms associated with the vulnerability of procrastinators still need to be identified
  • The current study examined the associations among procrastination, ruminative brooding, mindfulness, and self-compassion
  • Procrastination was measured in terms of academic procrastination as well as a cognitive measure of procrastination examining the frequency of procrastination-related automatic thoughts
  • Correlational analyses showed that both procrastination measures were associated with ruminative brooding as well as reduced mindfulness and self-compassion
  • Our findings highlight the relevance of cognitive factors in explaining procrastination and depression
  • These results imply that procrastinators might be vulnerable to depression due to the joint presence of these cognitive risk and resilience factors

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