Pyrolytic formation of a carbonaceous solid for heavy metal adsorption

The solid-state pyrolysis of acetylenedicarboxylic acid, monopotassium salt at 300 °C in air results in bulk quantities of a micron-sized yet macroporous oxidized carbon, which inherently possesses high content of metal-binding sites, such as carboxylate groups, free radicals, and ether/hydroxyl units

A. B. Bourlinos; M. A. Karakassides; P. Stathi; Y. Deligiannakis; R. Zboril; P. Dallas; T. A. Steriotis; A. K. Stubos; C. Trapalis

2010

Scholarcy highlights

  • The solid-state pyrolysis of acetylenedicarboxylic acid, monopotassium salt at 300 °C in air results in bulk quantities of a micron-sized yet macroporous oxidized carbon, which inherently possesses high content of metal-binding sites, such as carboxylate groups, free radicals, and ether/hydroxyl units
  • Besides its high oxygen content, the solid is stable in water and does not leach or disorient, while it exhibits an appreciable thermal stability, at temperature exceeding 200 °C in air
  • Several techniques including TEM/SEM, TGA, Raman/FT-IR, XPS, EPR, and potentiometric titrations were employed for the characterization of the solid
  • Liquid phase adsorption experiments revealed that the material is an efficient heavy metal adsorbent due to the presence of diverse surface-accessible binding sites, showing unusually high metal uptake capacities for Pb2+ and Cu2+ ions

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