Human morphology and temperature regulation

For nearly a century individuals have believed that there is a link between human morphology and one’s thermoregulatory response in adverse environments

G. S. Anderson

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • For nearly a century individuals have believed that there is a link between human morphology and one’s thermoregulatory response in adverse environments
  • Most early research was focussed on the rate of core cooling in a male adult population and the role of subcutaneous adipose tissue, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio in one’s ability to withstand varying degrees of cold stress
  • Since the late 1970s an emphasis has been placed on the role of muscle and muscle perfusion in total-body thermal insulation
  • Despite the history of research pertaining to human morphology and temperature regulation there is little consensus as to the impact of variations in human morphology on thermoregulatory responses
  • It is the purpose of this paper to examine the literature pertaining to the impact of variations in muscularity, adipose tissue thickness and patterning, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio on thermoregulation and thermal stability in response to both heat and cold stress

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