Warfare in prehistoric and early historic eastern North America

Recent criticisms of the use of historically and ethnographically recorded conflicts as models for warfare in prehistoric times force archaeologists to reexamine assumptions about the frequency, severity, and effects of intergroup fighting

George R. Milner

2006

Scholarcy highlights

  • Recent criticisms of the use of historically and ethnographically recorded conflicts as models for warfare in prehistoric times force archaeologists to reexamine assumptions about the frequency, severity, and effects of intergroup fighting
  • Variation in palisade strength is consistent with the organizational structure and warrior mobilization potential of late prehistoric societies in different parts of the Eastern Woodlands
  • Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology, Philadelphia
  • D..Archeological Exploration of Patawomeke: The Indian Town Site Ancestral to the One Visited in 1608 by Captain John Smith, Contributions to Anthropology 36, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

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