Producing speech use in nonverbal autistic children by reinforcing attempts

It has been extremely difficult to teach speech to severely handicapped nonverbal autistic children

Robert L. Koegel

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • It has been extremely difficult to teach speech to severely handicapped nonverbal autistic children
  • An overview of the literature suggests the possibility that selecting aspects of motivation as a central target behavior, rather than concentrating on motor speech production per se, may improve the effectiveness of teaching speech to these children
  • The results, replicated within a repeated reversal disign, showed that reinforcing speech attempts was more effective than reinforcing motor speech sounds with respect to the children's interest, enthusiasm, happiness, and general behavior during treatment; and improvements in the children's speech production
  • The results are discussed in terms of their relationship to the literature on normal parent-child speech interaction, success and failure, and learned helplessness

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