A study of the influence of fibre/resin adhesion on the mechanical behaviour of ultra-high-modulus polyethylene fibre composites

The interlaminar shear strength of unidirectional ultra-high-modulus polyethylene composites was measured as a means of accessing the level of fibre/epoxy resin adhesion for a number of different reinforcing yarns, produced by melt and gel-spinning

B. Tissington; G. Pollard; I. M. Ward

2004

Key concepts

Scholarcy highlights

  • The interlaminar shear strength of unidirectional ultra-high-modulus polyethylene composites was measured as a means of accessing the level of fibre/epoxy resin adhesion for a number of different reinforcing yarns, produced by melt and gel-spinning
  • The fibres were shown to possess poor adhesive properties due partly to inadequate wetting associated with the inert polyolefine surface and because of a weak boundary layer, formed by the segregation of low molecular weight impurities to the surface during fibre formation
  • The interlaminar shear strength was significantly increased by pretreating the reinforcement with an oxygen plasma
  • This improved wetting by producing oxygen-containing groups on the fibre surface and removed the weak boundary layer by the formation of a cross-linked skin
  • For a fixed fibre volume fraction, the interlaminar shear strength was found to be inversely proportional to the filament diameter
  • The other mechanical properties were shown to be largely independent of fibre/resin adhesion, with plasma treatment having little or no effect

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