Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR): A New Perspective in Abiotic Stress Management of Crop Plants

Rapid intensification in agricultural production systems over the past few decades has affected the environment, leading to several consequences including poor soil health, pollution, and increased abiotic and biotic stress

Madhumita Barooah; Gunajit Goswami; Sudipta Sankar Bora

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Rapid intensification in agricultural production systems over the past few decades has affected the environment, leading to several consequences including poor soil health, pollution, and increased abiotic and biotic stress
  • Several studies point to the beneficial microbes, especially plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, which play a pivotal role in aiding the plants to overcome abiotic stresses and retain their productivity
  • Beneficial soil bacteria either live symbiotically with plants in the rhizosphere or as endophytes inside of the host plants. They aid in plant growth directly by secretion of phytohormone, enzymes, and biological nitrogen fixation, solubilizing minerals or mineralizing organic phosphate and producing organic matter such as amino acids
  • The basic mechanisms by which PGPR help plants to cope against abiotic stress include lowering ethylene levels, production and accumulation of compatible solutes such as proline and glycine betaine, and decreasing the production of ROS
  • The use of PGPR is suitable for ameliorating the environmental stress encountered by the crop plants and can be considered as an important component of sustainable agricultural practices

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