Aspirin-induced asthma and cyclooxygenases

Bronchial asthma, irrespective of its specific triggers, is by and large an inflammatory disease

R. J. Gryglewski

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Bronchial asthma, irrespective of its specific triggers, is by and large an inflammatory disease
  • Activated T lymphocytes release various cytokines which promote recruitment, activation and secretion of mast cells, eosinophils and macrophages in the airways. Activation of these cells is associated with local release of pro-inflammatory, bronchoconstrictor or cytotoxic agents such as interleukins, proteases, superoxide anion, histamine, platelet activating factor and a number of eicosanoids including sulphidopeptide-leukotrienes, leukotriene B4(LTB4), thromboxane A2, prostaglandins F2α and D2(PGF2α and PGD2)
  • These mediators contribute to an increase in vascular permeability, oedema, migration of leukocytes to tissues, epithelial shedding, fibroblast proliferation, bronchoconstriction, hyperreactivity of bronchi, rhinorrhea, cough and wheezing
  • Nitric oxide plays an ambiguous role in inflammatory response; in the lung it acts in opposition to pneumotoxic lipids), unless overproduction of NO, together with O2− yields toxic peroxynitrite

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