The Role of Strigolactones in Plant–Microbe Interactions

Plants associate with an infinite number of microorganisms that interact with their hosts in a mutualistic or parasitic manner

Soizic Rochange; Sofie Goormachtig; Juan Antonio Lopez-Raez; Caroline Gutjahr

2019

Scholarcy highlights

  • Plants associate with an infinite number of microorganisms that interact with their hosts in a mutualistic or parasitic manner
  • Of chemical compounds with several phenyl-rings often containing a keto group. They are widespread in the plant kingdom and act, for example, as flower colors, as toxic deterrents of pathogens, or as attractants of rhizobia in the rhizosphere
  • The term microbiome describes the community of microbes colonizing certain niche including bacteria, archaea, protists, fungi, and viruses or their collective genomes
  • Root nodule in its earliest recognizable stage, from when cell division has started to a visible small white nodule, before the nodule is mature and functional
  • Symbiosis between plants of most legumes and bacteria belonging to the rhizobia or less frequent members of the Fagales, Cucurbitales, and Rosales and actinomycetes
  • The bacteria are hosted in membrane-surrounded compartments in cells of root nodules, which are lateral organs derived from cell division
  • Fusconi A Regulation of root morphogenesis in arbuscular mycorrhizae: what role do fungal exudates, phosphate, sugars and hormones play in lateral root formation?

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