Migration in the Americas

The nations of North, Central and South America and the Caribbean have been made and re-made by the migrations of the last half-millennium

Stephen Castles; Hein de Haas; Mark J. Miller

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • The nations of North, Central and South America and the Caribbean have been made and re-made by the migrations of the last half-millennium
  • Immigration and settlement was a crucial component of the process of colonization that began in the late fifteenth century when Spain, Portugal, England and France fought to gain control over the ‘New World
  • The fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries were marked by conquest and resource extraction, at first from gold and silver mines and from sugar, tobacco and other plantations
  • While the indigenous population decreased due to the diseases, massacres and forced labour brought by colonization, the arrival and settlement of European migrants and African slaves, along with the consequent process of mestizaje, produced deep and lasting changes, which helped create the contemporary face of this continent

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