Single and multispecies reference points for Baltic fish stocks

The results clearly show how single-species reference points are affected by species interaction

H Gislason

2002

Scholarcy highlights

  • The call to develop a precautionary approach to fisheries management has recently renewed the debate about the definition and estimation of biological reference points (e.g
  • Biological reference points are often derived from models where the yield from the fishery and the biomass of the exploited stock is related to fishing mortality
  • In the two multispecies models, FMSY depends on the amount of pelagic fishing effort, because cod cannibalism increases as the pelagic fishery reduces the biomass of herring and sprat
  • The results clearly show how single-species reference points are affected by species interaction
  • The single-species estimates do not always fall on the curves generated by the multispecies models
  • The fishing mortality where SSB fell below 50% of the virgin SSB, and the precautionary biomass reference point, Bpa adopted by previous research
  • Compared to the single-species predictions, both multispecies models predict that higher efforts than the present are needed to achieve MSY in the two fisheries
  • Besides the need to provide a relative value to the landings of different species and fleets, one of the main impediments for using multispecies models is the difficulty of illustrating the present situation in relation to the reference points in an easy comprehensible way, when more than two species and fisheries are considered

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