Drug induced movement disorders

Following the initial presentation of tardive syndromes, which represent the most challenging conditions among Drug-induced movement disorders, the current review focuses on the concise delineation of each movement disorder induced by pharmaceuticals as well as on the discussion of potential therapeutic options

2004

Scholarcy highlights

  • Drug-induced movement disorders can be caused by several kinds of agents and almost all sorts of movement disorders can occur as a result of medication side effect
  • The underlying pathomechanism is only known in a subset of DIMDs; an altered neurotransmission in the basal ganglia and the cerebellum is presumed to play a role
  • Following the initial presentation of tardive syndromes, which represent the most challenging conditions among DIMDs, the current review focuses on the concise delineation of each movement disorder induced by pharmaceuticals as well as on the discussion of potential therapeutic options
  • DIMDs represent a specific aspect of patient care
  • On the other hand, we should be very cautious with the application of medications with the potential of inducing serious side effects that include movement disorders. These kinds of medications are ought to be applied for as short duration and in as low dose as the appropriate management and the condition of the patients allows
  • With regard to reducing the prevalence of DIMDs the following considerations should be kept in mind in relation to the subsequent groups of pharmaceutical agents where the choice of drug or dose have special implications: 1) neuroleptics: the preferred use of atypical agents in low therapeutic doses; 2) mood stabilizers: paying close attention to the narrow therapeutic range of lithium; 3) calcium channel blockers: the preferred use of new generation agents with better side-effect profile; 4) gastrointestinal agents: the preferred use of new generation agents with lower penetration through the blood-brain barrier; 5) antiepileptics: paying close attention to the proper application of drugs keeping serum levels in therapeutic ranges; 6) antimicrobials: targeted antimicrobial therapy in the appropriate dose for only the necessary duration; 7) opioids: only when NSAIDs are not effective as pain killers; 8) hypnotics: the preferred application of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics
  • These kinds of medications are ought to be applied for as short duration and in as low dose as the appropriate management and the condition of the patients allows

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.