Kinetics of chlorine decay

Proper understanding, characterization, and prediction of water quality behavior in drinking water distribution systems are critical to ensure meeting regulatory requirements and customer-oriented expectations

John J. Vasconcelos; Lewis A. Rossman; Walter M. Grayman; Paul F. Boulos; Robert M. Clark

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Models of chlorine kinetics in distribution systems characterize chlorine decay as a combination of first-order decay in the bulk liquid and first-order or zero-order decay reactions at the pipe wall
  • Proper understanding, characterization, and prediction of water quality behavior in drinking water distribution systems are critical to ensure meeting regulatory requirements and customer-oriented expectations
  • This article investigates the factors leading to loss of chlorine residual in water distribution systems
  • Kinetic rate equations describing the decay of chlorine were developed, tested, and evaluated using data collected in field-sampling studies conducted at several water utility sites
  • Results indicated that chlorine decay in distribution systems can be characterized as a combination of first-order reactions in the bulk liquid and first-order or zero-order mass transfer–limited reactions at the pipe wall
  • Wall reaction kinetic constants were inversely proportional to pipe roughness coefficients. Wide variations in both bulk reaction constants and wall reaction constants were observed among the sites

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