Lead and Antimony Removal from Contaminated Soil by Phytoremediation Combined with an Immobilization Material

We found that evapotranspiration and shoot biomass were significantly higher in plants grown using phytosuction separation than those grown using PE

Masahiko Katoh; Kazuki Hashimoto; Takeshi Sato

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Phytoextraction requires long periods for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil, even when using a hyperaccumulator
  • We designed a new phytoremediation technique called phytosuction separation, in which a material that immobilized heavy metals was placed onto contaminated soil and plants were grown on the upper layer of this material
  • Heavy metals in the soil were transported toward the upper layer by the water suction effect of the roots and immobilized by the material and removed from the contaminated soil
  • We found that evapotranspiration and shoot biomass were significantly higher in plants grown using PS-S than those grown using PE
  • The pot experiment demonstrated that PS-S was effective in removing Pb and Sb, and the concentrations of Pb and Sb removed by PS-S were 8–25 and 69–533 times higher than that removed by PE, respectively
  • This study clearly demonstrated that PS-S was effective in removing Pb and Sb from the contaminated soil and would be useful for removing elements with high mobility

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