The origin of the epicardium and the embryonic myocardial circulation in the mouse

The origin of the epicardium and the formation of the early blood vessels of the heart prior to the opening of the coronary arteries from the aorta have been studied in the 9–13.5 day post coitum mouse embryo heart

Szabolcs Viragh; Cyril E. Challice

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • The origin of the epicardium and the formation of the early blood vessels of the heart prior to the opening of the coronary arteries from the aorta have been studied in the 9–13.5 day post coitum mouse embryo heart
  • The epicardium begins to appear by 9 dpc
  • The ventrally migrating primordial epicardial tissue ensheaths lastly the truncus arteriosus, while the sinus venosus is coated with epicardium ab initio, where the epicardial cells derive in part from the cuboidal cells of the pleuroperitoneal canal and in part from the somatopleural cells
  • The early blood vessel formation follows in space and time the development of the epicardium
  • The first blood vessels appear by 10 dpc by the invagination of the endocardium into the early sinus muscle, and at the same time in the ventricular chamber by the encasing of the endocardium, as the trabeculae become consolidated into the myocardial walls
  • The definitive coronary artery openings appear by 13 dpc, allowing the high pressure blood from the aorta to flow into a preexisting vascular bed

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