Mechanism of intraoral transport in macaques

All mammals have the same divisions of cyclic movement of tongue and hyoid during mastication: a protraction or forward phase that begins at minimum gape, and a retraction or return phase

Herschel A. Franks

2006

Scholarcy highlights

  • All mammals have the same divisions of cyclic movement of tongue and hyoid during mastication: a protraction or forward phase that begins at minimum gape, and a retraction or return phase
  • Food is squeezed posteriorly by contact between the tongue surface and the palate anterior to the food. This mechanism of transport is occasionally seen in nonanthropoid mammals when they are transporting liquids from the oral cavity to the oropharynx
  • One morphological basis for this difference is the reduction in height of the rugae of the palate of macaques
  • Anthropoids and other mammals differ in the way they store food prior to swallowing
  • Most mammals transport and store food in the oropharynx for several cycles before a swallow clears that region of food. This behavior is correlated with differences in morphology of the oropharynx; anthropoids have reduced valleculae, the area in which other mammals store food prior to swallowing
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