Infrared Quantum Dots

Colloidal nanocrystals are quantum-size-effect tunable; offer an abundance of available surface area for electronic and chemical interactions; and are processible from organic or aqueous solution onto substrates rigid or flexible, smooth or rough, flat or curved, inorganic or organic, crystalline or amorphous, conducting, semiconducting, or insulating

E. H. Sargent

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • Colloidal nanocrystals are quantum-size-effect tunable; offer an abundance of available surface area for electronic and chemical interactions; and are processible from organic or aqueous solution onto substrates rigid or flexible, smooth or rough, flat or curved, inorganic or organic, crystalline or amorphous, conducting, semiconducting, or insulating
  • With the benefit of over a decade's progress in visible-light-emitting colloidal-quantum-dot synthesis, physical chemistry, and devices, significant progress has recently been made in infrared-active colloidal quantum dots and devices
  • The synthesis and properties of quantum dots are first reviewed: photoluminescence quantum efficiencies greater than 50 % are achievable in solution, and stable luminescent dots are available in organic and aqueous solvents
  • Optical gain from these processible materials with a threshold of 1 mJ cm–2 and an optical net modal gain coefficient of 260 ± 20 cm–1 have been reported

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