Interventions for the management of taste disturbances

We found very low quality evidence that was insufficient to conclude on the role of zinc supplements to improve taste perception by patients, we found moderate quality evidence that zinc supplements improve overall taste improvement in patients with zinc deficiency/idiopathic taste disorders

Sumanth Kumbargere Nagraj; Shetty Naresh; Kandula Srinivas; P Renjith George; Ashish Shrestha; David Levenson; Debra M Ferraiolo

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • The sense of taste is very much essential to the overall health of the individual
  • We found very low quality evidence that was insufficient to conclude on the role of zinc supplements to improve taste perception by patients, we found moderate quality evidence that zinc supplements improve overall taste improvement in patients with zinc deficiency/idiopathic taste disorders
  • We found low quality evidence that zinc supplements improve taste acuity in zinc deficient/idiopathic taste disorders and very low quality evidence for taste recognition improvement in children with taste disorders secondary to chronic renal failure
  • We did not find any evidence to conclude the role of zinc supplements for improving taste discrimination, or any evidence addressing health‐related quality of life due to taste disorders
  • We found low quality evidence that is not sufficient to conclude on the role of acupuncture for improving taste discrimination in cases of idiopathic dysgeusia and hypogeusia
  • One trial tested taste discrimination using acupuncture
  • We were unable to draw any conclusions regarding the superiority of zinc supplements or acupuncture as none of the trials compared these interventions

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