Ketogenic diet and other dietary treatments for epilepsy

The randomised controlled trials discussed in this review show promising results for the use of ketogenic diet in epilepsy

Kirsty Martin; Cerian F Jackson; Robert G Levy; Paul N Cooper

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • The ketogenic diet, being high in fat and low in carbohydrates, has been suggested to reduce seizure frequency
  • The randomised controlled trials discussed in this review show promising results for the use of KDs in epilepsy
  • The limited number of studies, small sample sizes and a sole paediatric population resulted in a poor overall quality of evidence
  • There was a lack of evidence to support the clinical use of KD in adults with epilepsy, further research would be of benefit
  • This review aims to assess the effectiveness of KDs and other dietary interventions when considering randomised controlled trials
  • Kossoff 2007 reported a significant difference in seizure reduction after three months, between 10 g carbohydrate modified Atkins diet and 20 g carbohydrate MAD, with 60% of participants in the 10 g carbohydrate/day group having greater than 50% seizure reduction compared to 10% of participants in the 20 g carbohydrate/day group
  • We found no RCTs into the effects of a KD or similar diets on psychosocial impact
  • Attrition rates remained a problem with all ketogenic diet and across all studies, reasons for this being lack of observed efficacy and dietary tolerance

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