Vegetarian Diets and Blood Pressure

These results suggest that the association between vegetarian diets and lower blood pressure in adults is stronger among men and those with higher baseline BP and body mass index

Yoko Yokoyama; Kunihiro Nishimura; Neal D. Barnard; Misa Takegami; Makoto Watanabe; Akira Sekikawa; Tomonori Okamura; Yoshihiro Miyamoto

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • DATA SOURCES MEDLINE and Web of Science were searched for articles published in English from 1946 to October 2013 and from 1900 to November 2013, respectively
  • In the 7 controlled trials, consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with a reduction in mean systolic blood pressure and diastolic BP compared with the consumption of omnivorous diets
  • In the 32 observational studies, consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with lower mean systolic BP and diastolic BP compared with the consumption of omnivorous diets
  • Consumption of vegetarian diets is associated with lower BP
  • Vegan diets were defined as omitting all animal products; vegetarian diets may include some animal products as indicated by the terms lacto and ovo. These factors were not significant in the meta-regression of clinical trials. These results suggest that the association between vegetarian diets and lower BP in adults is stronger among men and those with higher baseline BP and body mass index
  • Further studies are required to clarify which types of vegetarian diets are most strongly associated with lower BP
  • Research into the implementation of such diets, either as public health initiatives aiming at prevention of hypertension or in clinical settings, would be of great potential value

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