Conjunctivitis

Treatment with topical antibiotics is usually recommended for contact lens wearers, those with mucopurulent discharge and eye pain, suspected cases of chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis, and patients with preexisting ocular surface disease.14,18

Amir A. Azari; Neal P. Barney

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Signs and symptoms include red eye, purulent or mucopurulent discharge, and chemosis. The period of incubation and communicability is estimated to be 1 to 7 days and 2 to 7 days, respectively. Bilateral mattering of the eyelids and adherence of the eyelids, lack of itching, and no history of conjunctivitis are strong positive predictors of bacterial conjunctivitis. Severe purulent discharge should always be cultured and gonococcal conjunctivitis should be considered. Conjunctivitis not responding to standard antibiotic therapy in sexually active patients warrants a chlamydial evaluation
  • Nonherpetic viral conjunctivitis followed by bacterial conjunctivitis is the most common cause for infectious conjunctivitis
  • There is no role for the use of topical antibiotics in viral conjunctivitis, and they should be avoided because of adverse treatment effects
  • Treatment with topical antibiotics is usually recommended for contact lens wearers, those with mucopurulent discharge and eye pain, suspected cases of chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis, and patients with preexisting ocular surface disease
  • The majority of cases of allergic conjunctivitis are due to seasonal allergies
  • Infants with chlamydial conjunctivitis require systemic therapy because more than 50% can have concurrent lung, nasopharynx, and genital tract infection
  • Steroids must be used judiciously and only after a thorough ophthalmologic examination has been performed to rule out her petic infection or corneal involvement, both of which can worsen with steroids

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