An Intensive Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention and Hot Flushes in Women<alt-title>Weight Loss Intervention and Hot Flushes</alt-title>

We examined whether changes in weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and overall physical or mental functioning were associated with improvement in bothersome hot flushes in this population

Alison J. Huang

2010

Scholarcy highlights

  • Higher body mass index is associated with worse hot flushes during menopause but the effect of weight loss on flushing is unclear
  • The intervention was associated with greater improvement in bothersome flushes vs control
  • Reductions in weight, body mass index, and abdominal circumference were each associated with improvement in flushing, but changes in physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and physical and mental functioning were not related
  • Among women who were overweight or obese and had bothersome hot flushes, an intensive behavioral weight loss intervention resulted in improvement in flushing relative to control
  • We examined whether changes in weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and overall physical or mental functioning were associated with improvement in bothersome hot flushes in this population
  • The effect of the intensive intervention on bothersome hot flushes was modestly decreased and no longer statistically significant after adjustment for improvement in weight
  • In aggregate analyses of all women reporting bothersome hot flushes at baseline, decrease in weight, decrease in BMI, and decrease in abdominal circumference were each associated with improvement in selfreported hot flushes during 6 months

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